Robinson Tweedy

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Robinson Tweedy
Announcement Date: November 9, 2018

Robin Snook provided this information about his great uncle, Robinson Tweedy.

3412/200048 Private Robinson Tweedy of the Yorkshire Regiment went to war with his younger brother, Charles from their home in Kirkby Fleetham. He was wounded in February 1916 near Ypres, receiving a gun shot wound to the abdomen. He was honourably discharged and returned home. he died on 14 December 1918 from his wound and laid to rest in Great Fencote’s churchyard.

Medical record detailing Robinson’s injury

Robinson Tweedy’s medal card

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