Percival Charles du Sautoy Leather

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Percival Charles du Sautoy Leather
Announcement Date: October 15, 2018

Teresa Maxwell came into the museum to tell us about her grandfather, Percival Charles du Sautoy Leather.

Captain Leather was born at Cramond near Edinburgh on 28th March 1867. He graduated from New College, Oxford in 1886. He worked as a Tea Planter and Stock Broker.

Captain Leather original saw service as a Captain with the 3rd Battalion, the Northumberland Fusiliers but was transferred to the 4th Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment on 5th September 1914 and he joined his new Battalion in France on 8th May 1915. It was not long before he was in action and he suffered the effects of a gas attack on 23rd May 1915 and was wounded again at Sanctuary Wood in June 1916. His wounds ended his military service and he relinquished his Commission on account of ill health stemming from his wounds and was granted the honorary rank of Captain from 15th November 1918.

After the war Percival lived at Maison Dieu in Richmond where he died on 4th October 1944.

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