Major T E Young

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Major T E Young
Announcement Date: May 23, 2018

Submitted by Will Young.

1/6th (Perthshire) Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

Thomas Young (TEY), my grandfather, was born in 1874 and commissioned into 4th (Volunteer) Battalion, Black Watch in 1898.
At the outbreak of the First World War, he commanded “F” (Auchterarder) Company, 1/6th Black Watch, and was mobilised on 5th August 1914 and went with them to their war station which was at North Queensferry on the north side of the River Forth close to the railway bridge.
He did not accompany the battalion when it went overseas in May 1915, and until he did go to France he served with one of the reserve battalions at various locations in the UK.

TEY re-joined the 1/6th near Arras on 9th July 1916. The battalion went south to the Somme and after their costly attack near High Wood the Officer commanding “C” Company was killed, he took over its command. The 1/6th was withdrawn from the battle area and moved north to Armentieres. They stayed in this area until early October and during this time spent 28 days in the trenches, sometime in a “Rest Camp” and the remainder of the time training or working, and one day at the Divisional Horse Show. The battalion moved back to the Somme and on the 13th November he was wounded at Beaumont Hamel, during the Battle of the Ancre. After treatment in a hospital in France he was evacuated to the UK. He did not return to the front and left the Army in 1920.

My grandfather became involved with the welfare of ex-servicemen and was instrumental in the formation of the local branch of the Comrades of the Great War which was to become part of the Royal British Legion. He was President of the Auchterarder branch of the RBL, Chairman of Perth and Angus and a Vice President of the Royal British Legion (Scotland).
He died in 1941.

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