Regimental Chapel, St Mary’s Church

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Regimental Chapel, St Mary’s Church
Announcement Date: November 2, 2018

In 1930 St Mary’s Parish Church offered the Lady Chapel as a memorial chapel for the Green Howards. This gift recognised that for over a century St Mary’s had been the garrison church for the regiment. The church already held the Green Howard’s Book of Remembrance for those who had been killed in the First World War, the regiment’s old Colours (Regimental flags) and many individual memorials.

Fundraising began in 1931 but the economic depression made for a very challenging campaign. In August £386 had been raised but in September the regimental magazine noted, ‘Subscriptions to the Chapel fund have been most disappointing. In view of the present depressing state of the country this is not altogether surprising, but the Committee most earnestly appeal to all Green Howards to do their utmost to assist in completing the Chapel as a tribute to those whose memory it will perpetuate.’ The cry for assistance was heard and by the end of 1931 a date of Sunday, March 13th 1932 had been set for the dedication of the Chapel.

The dedication service was led by the Bishop of Ripon. In his sermon he praised the Green Howards for providing a, ‘special place of prayer. It was a reminder that the war has a spiritual and Godward side, and taught them, among other things, the hopelessness of materialism as a way of life.’

As well as housing the Book of Remembrance the chapel also includes a number of items given in memory of soldiers killed during the First World War. The sanctuary lamp was given in memory of Captain Ernest Scott Broun who was killed during the first Battle of Ypres on the October 30th 1914 and the altar rail was dedicated to Lieutenant G S Roper and Lieutenant W P Orde-Powlett. Roper was killed in 1917 and Orde-Powlett in 1915.

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  • Willimina ‘Minnie’ Melville

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  • Captain Thomas Ernest Dufty

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