Maud Florence Hoare

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Maud Florence Hoare
Announcement Date: February 27, 2018

Maud Florence Hoare

Maud was living in Ashford in Middlesex when she enrolled as a VAD for the British Red Cross. She joined in January 1915 and was stationed at the Military Hospital Catterick Camp.

Maud spent approximately a year at Catterick Camp. Stationed from 15th January 1918 until the 9th of February 1919.

This information, provided by Alathea Anderssohn has been drawn from the Imperial War Museum’s ‘Lives of the First World War’ archive.

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