4/7766 Private Thomas Holmes

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance 4/7766 Private Thomas Holmes
Announcement Date: May 23, 2018

Mary Burn visited the Green Howards Museum to tell us about her father’s cousin, Thomas Holmes.

Prior to the outbreak of the First World War, Thomas Holmes worked for Mr Gaffanney, a coal dealer in Leeds. As a reservist, he was called up on the outbreak of War to the 9th Battalion, the West Yorkshire Regiment while his brother served with the 1st Scots Guards. At only 19 years of age, Private Holmes was sent to Gallipoli. One of the thousands to die at Suvla Bay, he was killed on 29th October 1915 and is buried at Hill 10 cemetery along with 548 other casualties.

 

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  • Gosnay William Riley

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