Thomas William Richmond

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Thomas William Richmond
Announcement Date: March 6, 2018

Submitted by Anthony Sidlow.
Corporal Thomas Richmond (19039) served with 6th Battalion, the Yorkshire Regiment.

He was born in Hunslet, Leeds in 1888, and was a Brewers labourer at Tetleys Brewery.
Killed in Action on the 27 August 1917. Commemorated on the Tyne Cott memorial and also The Tetley Brewery, Leeds ‘Roll of Honour’.

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