Ernest John Tyler

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Ernest John Tyler
Announcement Date: November 1, 2018

Deirdre Tyler of Richmond explained the story of Ernest (Ernie) John Tyler to us at one of our drop-in days.

Ernie was born on 23 April 1880 in Edmonton, London. He served in the Royal Engineers 1914-1919, mainly with 29 Division and saw active service in the Dardanelles and the Somme. He embarked for his first active service on 2 June 1915.

He was one of the few Royal Engineers aboard the “S.S. River Clyde” in 1915, when it was ill-fatedly beached at “V” beach, Cape Helles, Gallipoli, under the guns of the defenders. Six VC’s were subsequently awarded to the ship’s crew for their courage in maintaining the bridge and rescuing the wounded from the beach.

Ernie subsequently spent time in Egypt and then at the Home Depot. He suffered from typhoid or enteric fever and as a result was granted home furlough from 29 February to 19 April 1916. He also caught malaria, being classed B,ii for six months as a result. He was awarded a Good Conduct Badge on 18 June 1917.

Ernie lost two of his brothers in the Great War, one at Gallipoli, and another at sea.

After the First World War, Ernie returned to his work in the postal service and was in charge of the first telegraph message motor cycle delivery riders.

He had six children who survived into adulthood. Five served their country in the forces; four in the second world war and one post war. Bernard, his eldest son, was killed in action at Anzio, where he is buried.

In WWII Ernie served as an ARP in the Heavy Rescue Team in the London Blitz. He was involved with the Civil Defence Corps, and was a keen life-long supporter of the Royal British Legion from its inception. He held several tenures as Chairman of the Benfleet Branch in Essex. He died in 1967.

This commemoration is dedicated to the service of Ernest J. Tyler, and to the service and ultimate personal sacrifice of two of his brothers, and his son Bernard E. Tyler, WWII (Anzio).

Posted on behalf of Ernest Tyler’s son, Major (retd) Royce Tyler, MBE, ex Vice Chairman of the Royal British Legion, Richmond Branch, and former dedicated volunteer at the Green Howards Regimental museum.

Deidre P.A. Tyler, daughter of Royce Tyler, both proudly, of Richmond.

Ernie’s medal card

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