General Sir E S Bulfin KCB CVO

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance General Sir E S Bulfin KCB CVO
Announcement Date: October 31, 2018

Bulfin was born in Woodtown Park, Rathfarnham, Co Dublin in 1862.
Although he attended Trinity College, Dublin, he did not take a degree, choosing a military career instead.He was commissioned into the Princess of Wales’s Own (Yorkshire Regiment) in 1884. After 30 years of service he became Colonel of the Regiment in 1914.

As Colonel, Bulfin wanted the Regiment to stand out in the Army Lists with a more unique name. He pushed for the traditional nickname of ‘The Green Howards’ to be made official to differentiate between all the other ‘Yorkshire’ Regiments.

He was finally successful in 1921, and the name lasted for the next 85 years.

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