Evelyn Fletcher

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Evelyn Fletcher
Announcement Date: October 26, 2018

Marion Moverley, a Richmond resident, provided us with information about her grandmother, Evelyn Fletcher.

My grandmother was called Evelyn Fletcher and born in 1898 in Halifax. She met my grandfather Tom Stocks who was born in 1897 in Bradford, and they married in 1920. They both played a part in the War. Tom joined up, Evelyn worked in munition factories.

The photograph shows a munitions factory in the Bradford/Halifax district, with two figures picked out by ‘x’ marks in biro. The girl marked on the left appears to be Evelyn and the one on the right is probably her sister, Lizzie Fletcher.

 

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