Driver John Marwood

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Driver John Marwood
Announcement Date: July 17, 2018

Submitted by Peter Marwood, a long term resident of Richmond.

I was brought up on my late father’s farm in Langthorne near Bedale.
Driver John Marwood 671397 of the 379th Battery, Royal Field Artillery was my father’s brother and my uncle.

John Marwood was born at Gayles near Richmond on the 16th of May 1890. He was the second of four children of John and Caroline Marwood.
The family initially lived at Gayles where John senior was self employed as a master carpenter. By 1901 the family had moved to a rented farm at Aske Moor and began farming. After a few years they moved to a larger and better farm which was Low Coalsgarth farm. John is listed in the 1911 census as working as a gardener at Selaby Hall near Gainford. The family were living at the farm at the time of John’s death in France.

He was wounded on the Somme during the famous Kaiserschlacht offensive which began on the 21st March 1918. My father and his other brother Harry recounted that John had been badly wounded at the Front and was taken to hospital in Rouen but sadly died of his wounds on the 25th of March 1918 aged 28.
He is buried in the St Sever cemetery in Rouen.

During the 1950s my father would usually attend the Great Yorkshire Show, along with my Uncle Harry and one older brother and if we were lucky myself or my younger brother would get to go too. There was always a demonstration by the Artillery of horse drawn guns and father would say “That’s what your late uncle John did during the Great War”.
John’s effects, that were returned from France, were kept on our farm. There were photographs, a uniform and a sword which fascinated us children. Sadly these possessions were lost when my father passed away and we left the farm.

John’s death is also commemorated on grandparents gravestone in Middleton Tyas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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