Corporal Tommy Edwards

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Corporal Tommy Edwards
Announcement Date: November 6, 2018

Steven Shackleton told us about his great uncle, Thomas Edwards from Ironbridge.

During the First World War, Tommy Edwards was a Corporal in the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Prior to the war he had served as 86589 Pte T Edwards with the Territorial Reserve Battalion. He served with the 10th KOYLI and then transfered to the 2nd KOYLI before he was killed in action on 30th September 1918, aged 19. He is buried at Bellicourt British Cemetery in France.

His mother was Mrs Francis Edwards of Hoylake, Cheshire and had the following inscription added to the bottom of his headstone: ‘Peace, perfect peace’.

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