Norman Angus

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Norman Angus
Announcement Date: October 15, 2018

Norman Angus was born at Southwick, Co. Durham in 1890. He was working as a miner prior to enlisting in September 1914. He was posted to the 8th Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment.

He would have been sent to France in September 1915 and he had a somewhat chequered career. He had been promoted to Corporal by early 1916 but was reduced to Private. He was wounded in December 1915 and again in September 1916 and unfortunately had to forfeit 6 days pay for unauthorised absence in 1917.

14043 Corporal Angus was awarded the 1915 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

He died aged 84 in March 1975.

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