Arthur Dobson

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Arthur Dobson
Announcement Date: August 31, 2018

Submitted by Paul Elliott.

Many people will, no doubt, have the same experience as myself, in that my grandparents and parents never discussed or talked about their war experiences.

Arthur Dobson was a Great Uncle of whom I was totally unaware. He was born in 1896 and lived with his parents, Benjamin and Emily at Commercial Street, Rothwell, Leeds. He was a miner.

He joined the Kings Own Yorkshire Light infantry as 37722 Private Dobson and went to France in September 1915 with the 9th Battalion. They were active at the Battle of the Somme and Arthur was posted as missing in September 1916. His parents twice put appeals for information about him in the Yorkshire Evening Post. He was eventually found to have been killed in action on September 16th 1916.

He is commemorated on Rothwell war memorial and at Thiepval. He was 20 when he died.

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