2nd Lieutenant Thomas Charles Goode M.B.E.

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance 2nd Lieutenant Thomas Charles Goode M.B.E.
Announcement Date: May 23, 2018

Researched by John Mills.

Born 27th of January 1880 Thomas was the son of Sergeant Valentine Goode also of the Yorkshire Regiment and his mother was called Helen. He was part of a large family; he had five brothers and two sisters.

He enlisted in Richmond on the 27th of August 1897. Being a first rate rifle shot he devoted himself to musketry and became an instructor. He served throughout the whole of the Boer War with the 1st Battalion. He was awarded the Queen’s medal with 6 clasps and the King’s with 2.

In 1905 he married Mary Agnes Grace Dobinson.

In 1914 he was with the 1st Battalion in India, his campaign medals indicate he was in France some time after 1915. He became a 2nd lieutenant in the Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert’s). He survived the war and retired with the rank of Captain on the 8th of June 1920.

He was awarded the M.B.E. on the 3rd of June 1919 for his services in connection with the war in India.

He must have returned to the army to serve in World War 2 because he has campaign medals (World War 2 service medal and war medal). Perhaps this might have been in some form of instructor role.

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