Albert Clifford

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Albert Clifford
Announcement Date: February 13, 2018

Submitted by Marcia Howard, a resident of Richmond.

Albert William George Clifford was my maternal Grandfather born at Chipping Sodbury, Gloucestershire in 1886.
Prior to his medical discharge in 1916, he was serving in Malta with No.1 Coy, of the Royal Garrison Artillery as a Gunner.

He was subsequently presented with the Silver War Badge which in September 1916, King George V had authorised to honour all military personnel who had served at home or overseas since 4 August 1914, and who had been discharged because of wounds or illness.

Following his return home to his wife and 2 small children in Gloucestershire, he became Chauffeur to the local doctor, where he also contributed to the recruitment drive popularly known as ‘Your Country Needs You’.

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