Frederick Crisp

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Frederick Crisp
Announcement Date: February 13, 2018

Submitted by Mike Crisp.

Private 85882 Frederick Crisp, from Beccles, served in 2 regiments initially the 5th Royal Irish Lancers and subsequently the 8th Battalion Kings Liverpool Regiment. His photograph was allegedly taken at the Currugh.

The war diary for Fred is quite detailed and it appears that he died in an unsuccessful evening attack on the Canal du Nord on 11th September 1918. The diary includes handwritten and typed operational orders and a post attack report.

During this attack the battalion suffered 16 killed, 70 wounded and 13 missing.
Fred is buried in the Commonwealth War Graves at the village of Mouvre.

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