2nd Lieutenant Richard Birkenhead Wilton

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance 2nd Lieutenant Richard Birkenhead Wilton
Announcement Date: October 26, 2018

Richard Birkenhead Wilton was the son of Charles and Elen Wilton of Stafford.

After the outbreak of war Richard joined the 15th (Reserve) Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment which had 12 officers and 750 non-commissioned officers and men. The battalion moved from Skipton to Rugeley in Staffordshire.

In January 1916 Richard is listed as a temporary Second Lieutenant in the Reserve battalion. November 1916 sees him transfered at that rank to the 9th battalion. The Green Howards Gazette records that Richard was Killed in action on 1st October 1917.

On the night of 30th September the 9th battalion took over from the 8th battalion in the line where the war diary states “Very heavy barrage put up by enemy from 4.30am; ‘C’ Coy on our left attacked; heavy casualties feared. Communication between HQs and Coys very difficult”

His death is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium.

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