2nd Lieutenant Philip Mayne

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance 2nd Lieutenant Philip Mayne
Announcement Date: May 21, 2018

Philip Mayne during World War 2

Philip Mayne was the last surviving British officer from World War One to die. He died at the age of 107 years and 139 days at a care hostel in Richmond, North Yorkshire in 2007.

Philip’s war service was was brief and he never saw any action. However he was the last verteran to die who held the rank of officer.
This happened thanks to a cadetship into the Royal Engineers which meant he was fast-tracked to second lieutenant — the lowest officer rank — in September 1918 at the age of just 18. The war ended six weeks later and he was demobilised on Christmas Eve 1918 without having set foot in France. Following the war he studied at Cambridge and became an engineer.

With a birth date of 22 November 1899, Mr Mayne was alive in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. At his death he had three children, eight grandchildren and twenty-one great-grandchildren.

Mr Mayne at the age of 106

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