Richard Adams

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Richard Adams
Announcement Date: November 5, 2018

Meryl Abbey sent us some information about her great uncle, Richard William Adams.

Richard served with the Yorkshire Regiment, arriving in France on 25th March 1915. Little is known about his service, but he served as 10438 Lance Corporal R Adams. He is buried at Bethune Town Cemetery having died on 30 August 1915. He was awarded the 1915 Star, the British War medal and the Victory medal.

Richard William Adams medal card

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