Wilfred Wood

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Wilfred Wood
Announcement Date: November 1, 2018

Wilfred Wood, an employee of the North Eastern Railway before the outbreak of war, served with the 5th battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment.

His commanding officer, 2nd Lt G H Smith wrote the following to his father:

“Dear Mr Wood – It is with deep regret that I inform you of the death in action of your son, Pte. W. Wood. He was instantaneously killed on the morning of the 19th instant by a whizz-bang shell, which dropped into the trench he was in; he was buried behind the line on the 20th, and a good cross is being erected to his memory. Words cannot express how deeply I feel for you in your great loss. He was a good soldier, and always kept up bright spirits. The men of my platoon join me in the deepest sympathy for you”

240637 Private W Wood died on 19 July 1917 and is buried at Heninel Communal Cemetery Extension.

 

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