Pte W L Robinson

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Pte W L Robinson
Announcement Date: April 17, 2018

William Lincoln Robinson was born in 1897, the son of a farmer. By the time of the 1911 census his mother had died and he was living with his father, and sister in Scorton, near Richmond.

Robinson enlisted in 1915. At the time he was working at Kirkbank, Middleton Tyas as a gardener.
He served with the 2nd and 6th Battalions of the Green Howards as a Lewis Gunner. He survived the war and was discharged from the army on the 15th February 1919.

At the moment we don’t know what happened to Robinson after he left the Army. Can you help? Robinson died aged 77 in 1975.

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