Phyllis Margaret Jenkins

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Phyllis Margaret Jenkins
Announcement Date: October 31, 2018

Phyllis was born in Dowlais, Glamorganshire, Wales in 1892, the daughter of Margaret Jane and David Thomas Jenkins.

She joined the British Red Cross on the 21st of January 1918. Subsequently, she was stationed as a Voluntary Aid Detachment Nurse in the Other Empire Force, British Red Cross, Catterick Camp.

Surviving photographs imply that Phyllis was part of the dental team
stationed at Catterick. Phyllis volunteered at Catterick Camp until the 14th February 1919.

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