Joseph Taylor

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Joseph Taylor
Announcement Date: March 6, 2018

Submitted by Angela Atkinson.

L/Sgt Joseph (Joe) Taylor – shown in the picture on the wall – served in 4th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment. Joe was my Grandad’s brother, born in 1887. Joseph worked as a length man on the North Eastern Railway before the war.

He was killed in action on 25/4/1915. He is commemorated at Ypres and on the Lych Gate in Brompton, Northallerton.

His parents were my great grandparents and I believe the others on the photo are all his family.

The other person in uniform is William Robert (Bill) Taylor, who was born in 1883.

Captain Stead wrote to Taylor’s family:-
“Sergeant Taylor, along with his Company Commander, Major Matthews, were the first of their battalion to fall for their Country. His rapid promotion shows the confidence that was placed in him.
He was an excellent soldier and a brave man.”

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