Gosnay William Riley

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Gosnay William Riley
Announcement Date: November 1, 2018

Diane Hawthorne sent in a request for us to look into her grandfather’s First World War service – this is what we managed to discover.
Gosnay William Riley attested on 10th December 1915 into the 11th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment at Brighouse and was assigned the regimental number 27654.

The 11th was a Home Service Battalion dealing with Drafts and Reinforcements. In September 1916 the 11th amalgamated with the 16th Durham Light Infantry as a Training Battalion thereby losing its distinct identity. At some time prior to this Gosnay transferred to the 10th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment. He had been promoted to the rank of Corporal.

Sometime thereafter he transferred to the 9th York and Lancaster Regiment. His Regimental number was 34441.

On the 3rd March 1919 he became a reservist in the British Army with many thousands of others.

Gosnay William Riley’s medal card

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