Gertrude Berry

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance
Announcement Date: March 13, 2018

Gertrude was born in 1891, She spent the war as a nurse in the Other Empire Force, Voluntary Aid Detachment, QAIMNS. She was sent straight to France upon joining the Red Cross and from the 9th November 1915 – 8th June 1916 and then 1st July 1916 – 1st August 1916 she was stationed in France.

In 1917 she married Harry O ‘Baines. Gertrude was posted from March 1917 until April 1917 at Military Hospital Havant before moving to Catterick Camp in March 1918.

This information has been drawn from the Imperial War Museum’s ‘Lives of the First World War’ archive.

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