Fred Ward

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Fred Ward
Announcement Date: March 6, 2018

Submitted by Jon Bemrose.

Private Fred Ward (50236) born 1898 in East Yorkshire. Working as a lad porter on the railway at Ampleforth before joining up.

Joined the Green Howards at Richmond, but he was transfered to the Northumberland Fusiliers.

Fred was in France, near Arras in early 1917 – Jon states:

“The fateful day was the Battle of Arras, Easter Monday 9th April. It must have been terrible, having heard and seen all the death and destruction that had occurred before they set off at around 9:00am.
My best guess is that they reached the “Blue” line, where they were hit by machinegun fire.
Whether initially buried by shell fire or his comrades, Fred was later found and finally burried at Orchard Dump Cemetery, Arleux en Gohelle.
I visited his grave in 2016, the first of the family to do so I am led to believe.”

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