David Logan

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance David Logan
Announcement Date: November 1, 2018

Mairi Featherstone visited the museum to see if we could find out a little about her grandfather, David Logan’s First World War service.

After a some investigation, it became clear that he had been in the Royal Field Artillery. On of the original postcards revealed that he had been at Scotton Camp (it is inscribed with “Cooks and Waiters, Sergeant’s Mess, Scotton Camp, Yorks 19/6”), which was eventually absorbed into Catterick Camp during the war. No 5 TF Artillery Training School was based at Scotton Camp in 1915, which is the most probable reason for his time there.

David’s medal card shows that he was in France by May 1915. There are two regimental numbers on his medal card, an early number, 971 referring to the Territorial Force RFA and a second reference 645569.

645569 Gunner David Logan was entitled to the 1915 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal at the end of his war service.

An unusual group photograph – David is on the right

David Logan at Scotton camp

 

 

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