Captain Thomas Ernest Dufty

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Captain Thomas Ernest Dufty
Announcement Date: October 23, 2018

Captain Thomas Ernest Dufty

5th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment

Captain Dufty was born in on the 30th of June 1880. His father was Arthur Richard Sykes Dufty and his mother was called Katie. He was educated at Pocklington Grammar School.
He joined the 5th Battalion in 1912 and became a lieutenant in June 1913. Prior to this his profession was as a banker and manager of the Bridlington branch of the London Joint Stock Bank.
Dufty was promoted to Captain on the 18th of April 1915.
He was reported as killed in action on or about the 19th of May 1915 (killed by a shell). His Battalion had been deployed to Sanctuary Wood (1.9 miles east of Ypres).
He left a widow, Beatrice, and a 4-year-old son Arthur Richard.
He is buried at the Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery in Belgium and commemorated at the Manor Road Cemetery Scarborough.

 

 

 

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