Albert Victor Taylor

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Albert Victor Taylor
Announcement Date: May 2, 2018

Submitted by David Taylor.

Albert Victor Taylor was my great uncle. He was born in Middlesbrough in 1897, the son of Thomas and Margaret Taylor (nee Hill). At the age of 3 in 1901 he was living at 119, Barritt Street, Middlesbrough with his father, a steam engine fitter and his mother.

By 1911 the family were living at 19, Haddon Street, Middlesbrough and Albert Victor’s Occupation was an errand boy for a leather merchant.

‘Vic’ (on the right) during his scouting days

‘Vic’ working as a messenger boy before the war.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like many others in his age group Albert Victor Taylor followed the call to join the Colours. He became a private in 1/5th Battalion Alexandra Princess of Wales’s Own Yorkshire Regiment. His service number was 241492 and he was killed in action at Berny-en-Santerre in France on March 3rd 1917. His name is inscribed on the Thiepval Memorial.

 

 

 

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