2nd Lt G H Smith

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance 2nd Lt G H Smith
Announcement Date: August 14, 2018

In October 1915 Geoffrey Howard Smith was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 5th Battalion from being a member of the ranks of the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps (O.T.C.). At that time he was probably based at the O.T.C. training camp at Berkhamsted Common Hertfordshire.

In August 1916 he is listed as wounded in France. He recovers from his wounds but in June 1918 he is listed as missing then confirmed as a prisoner of war in September 1918.

Smith remained in captivity until his release and return to England in January 1919. This event is recognised by a letter sent to him from King George V.

Letter received by Smith from George 5th

Caricature of 2nd Lt G H Smith

 

 

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