Lt Henry Stanley Tempest Bullen

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Lt Henry Stanley Tempest Bullen
Announcement Date: October 6, 2018

Jennifer Bullen visited the museum to show us the memorial plaque to Lt Henry Stanley Tempest Bullen, her father-in-laws elder brother.

Harry Bullen of ‘D’ Battery, 251st Brigade of the Royal Field Arilltery was Killed in Action on 14th April 1917 during the Battle of Arras (an action launched in support and as a diversionary action to the larger French offensive on the Chemin des Dames). He died at the age of 20 and is buried south of Arras at Beaurains Road Cemetery, which was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

His mother, Edith Bullen lived in Gosforth, Northumberland. A memorial window to Lt Bullen was erected in St Nicholas Church, Gosforth following the war.

Harry Bullen’s Memorial Plaque

Memorial window in memory of Harry Bullen

 

 

 

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