Joseph Snowden Atkinson

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Joseph Snowden Atkinson
Announcement Date: May 10, 2018

Submitted by Mavis Marwood a resident of Richmond for the last 10 years.

Private Joseph Snowden Atkinson (204103) was my grandfather. He was born in Gainford and lived in Ravensworth. Like his father his occupation was as a stonemason.
He served in France during the war and was one of the lucky soldiers to survive the conflict. One of the images is a handmade Christmas card that he sent from the front line to my mother when she was little girl.
On his return to Ravensworth he went on to become a master stonemason.

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