John William Lodge

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance John William Lodge
Announcement Date: September 1, 2018

John was born on the 8th August 1855, the only son of Robert and Mary Lodge of ‘The Rookery’ Bishopdale near Aysgarth. He was educated at St. Peter’s School York and admitted to Gonville and Caius College Cambridge. He graduated MA in 1879 and called to the Bar at the Inner Temple in 1883.

At 18 John joined the 5th West York Militia, which became the 3rd Battalion Yorkshire Regiment in 1881. He would serve with the Battalion in the 2nd Boer War (1899-1902). From 1906 until retirement in 1912 he would be the Battalion Commander. At the outbreak of the Great War John offered his services and returned to his old Battalion as Major, remaining with it until May 5th 1916 when he was appointed to the command of a Garrison Battalion. This he held until the time of his death. He had been associated with the Yorkshire Regiment for 43 years.

As Squire of Bishopdale, Colonel Lodge was JP for the North Riding and was on the Yorkshire Fisheries Board. He was a skilled angler and marksman. John never married. He died after a short illness on the 23rd August 1917 aged 60.

The house ‘The Rookery’ which the family had built in mid Victorian times was demolished in the 1920s.

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