Charles Tweedy

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Charles Tweedy
Announcement Date: November 9, 2018

Robin Snook submitted this information about his grandfather, Charles Tweedy.

113319 Driver Charles Tweedy served with the Royal Horse Artillery. He signed up on 29th October 1915 in Richmond and spent time at the North Training Camp at Ripon. He fought in France and at one point the horse that he was riding was blown from underneath him. He was lucky though and survived to fight another day. The horse’s bit is still in the family to this day.

Part of Charles’ service record showing some of his postings and hospitalisation

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