Arthur John Buchanan Richardson

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Arthur John Buchanan Richardson
Announcement Date: October 6, 2018

Arthur John Buchanan Richardson

Arthur was born in Guisborough North Yorkshire in the first quarter 1895. He was the eldest son of Colonel William Richardson, a solicitor of Guisborough and his wife Averil Mary, daughter of Arthur Buchannan, also a solicitor of Guisborough.
Arthur entered Rugby Public School, Warwickshire, in 1909 and left in 1913. In August 1913 he entered as an Articled Clerk in the firm of Solicitors founded by his great grandfather and carried on by his grandfather.
He received his Commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 4th Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment in June, 1913, and went to camp with them in August, 1913.

He was again in camp in August 1914, at Colwyn Bay, when War broke out. The Regiment was recalled into training at Darlington, when he was given the command and a new Company of Signallers. He next went with the Battalion to Newcastle on Tyne, on coastal defence.

Arthur would not die leading his men over no-man’s-land or in some heroic fighting. He would die of meningitis, contracted on service, in his billet at Newcastle on 4th January 1915. Three months later, the Battalion went out to France. Arthur was just 19 years old.

A local newspaper report, headed “Cleveland Mourns the Death of a Gallant Officer”, provides details of a military funeral at Guisborough Church attended by local dignitaries:
‘The coffin was borne by men of the 4th Battalion, with fellow Officers Colonel Bell, Captain Charlton and Lts Williams and Jervelund present. Men of the 7th Devon Territorials, who were stationed in Guisborough at the time, also paraded. The Union Jack draped coffin was interred in Guisborough Cemetery with the customary firing of three volleys and buglers sounding the Last Post.’
By all accounts Arthur was a happy cheerful lad liked by all. His Colonel said: ‘Remember that he died for his country as much as though he had been killed at the front’.

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