Albert Norris

Timelines: Ribbon of Remembrance Albert Norris
Announcement Date: August 14, 2018

265990 Private Albert Norris served in the Yorkshire Regiment, joining up sometime after January 1915.

For his service during the First World War he was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal. He was transferred to the Royal Munster Fusiliers and served at the garrison in Cork. Following the war, he ran a Draper’s shop in Tonbridge, Kent. In 1924 He married Myra Donovan. Albert’s step granddaughter is Dame Kelly Holmes, double Olympic Champion.

Albert Norris’ Medal card

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